Books Read in 2018

Happy New Year everyone! Every end of the year for a number of years now I post a list of the books I’ve finished reading in that year. I’m sorry I don’t have time to also put in the corresponding links to Amazon but you can always look these books up yourself. So here they are.

January

  • Sepallo’s THE HAPPINESS TRACK. A self-help book on “How to apply the science of happiness to accelerate your success.” Imagine that! Happiness is a science now.

February

  • Kiyosaki’s RICH DAD, POOR DAD. A book containing common-sense advice on money: save rather than spend. Make your money work for you.

March

  • Strachan and Sweeney’s JONATHAN EDWARDS ON HEAVEN AND HELL. A very short book summarising Jonathan Edwards’ teachings on heaven and hell and containing excerpts from his writings. Part of the Essential Jonathan Edwards Collection.

April

  • Cal Newport’s SO GOOD THEY CAN’T IGNORE YOU. A self-help book on mastering something and really becoming good at it. What I got from this book is mastery trumps passion. Or master the thing first and the passion will follow.
  • Marcus Aurelius’ MEDITATIONS (Hay’s transalation). I was encouraged to buy this after reading Ryan Holiday’s recommendation. He’s supposed to have read this a hundred times! It’s about the Stoic approach to dealing with life.

May

  • Baumeister & Tierney’s WILL POWER. Willpower is like a muscle. It can be developed and strengthened but it can also tire. So you have to be strategic in the way you use it.
  • Dreyfus and Kelly’s ALL THINGS SHINING. A combination of philosophy and literature: “Reading the Western classics to find meaning in a secular age.”

June

  • McGrath’s WHY GOD WON’T GO AWAY. An apologetics book. Yes, it does seem belief in God isn’t going away anytime soon.
  • Luc Ferry’s A BRIEF HISTORY OF THOUGHT. A short book on the history philosophy.

July

  • Barret & Haykin’s OWEN ON THE CHRISTIAN LIFE. John Owen is one of my favorite theologians – hard to read but rich in spiritual insight. Very beneficial to one’s soul. It’s in this book that I found his opinion approving the role of lay-preachers (such as I am). That’ a relief because Martyn Lloyd Jones and William Gurnall seem to hold the opposite view.
  • Toobin’s THE OATH. An elder lawyer whom I admire a lot introduced me to Jeffrey Toobin by recommending to me his book entitled The Nine. I liked it a lot and so when I saw a copy of The Oath I bought it and was duly entertained. It’s about Chief Justice John Roberts forgetting the precise words of the oath that President Obama had to repeat during the latter’s swearing-in ceremony and the legal implications thereof.
  • Dante’s PURGATORIO (Mandelabaum’s translation). I’ve read Dante’s Divine Comedy a number of times. Frankly, the Inferno (part 1 of the Divine Comedy) is easier to follow, but this is one of the enduring classics of world literature so I just keep reading even though it’s difficult to follow at times.

August

  • Auchincloss’ WOODROW WILSON. A short biography of a great American president – eloquent, scholarly but a flawed human being. Come to think of it, who isn’t?

September

  • John Owen on APOSTASY (in volume 7 of his Works). I read the Puritan Paperback abridged version a long time ago. This time it’s the complete version. What I gather from Owen is that a true Christian can backslide seriously and even for a long period of time, but he can never completely reject the faith and turn away from it, otherwise, that would mean he was never really “saved” in the first place.

October

  • Guthrie’s CREATOR SPIRIT. A book on the theology of the arts, particularly the role of the Holy Spirit in human creativity.
  • Prior’s ON READING WELL. The title says it all. I read the ebook version on my Kindle device.

November

  • Duriez’ FRANCIS SCHAEFFER’S AN AUTHENTIC LIFE. A very good biography of a great Christian apologist whose influence as such is second only to C.S. Lewis. The great lesson I got from his life is that “Love is the final apologetic.”

December

  • Denise Levertov’s COLLECTED EARLIER POEMS 1940-1960. A really good poet. Here’s a couple of lines by him that I really like: “Our lives flower and pass. Only robust/ works of the imagination live in eternity.”
  • Babineux and Krumboltz’ FAIL FAST, FAIL OFTEN. I have a lot of self-help books in my library. They have their value. I found this book helpful in that it provided me an antidote to my tendency towards perfectionism. Technically, I haven’t finished it yet but I’m almost there.

So there you have it. Hope you might be interested enough to get hold of some of these books. In 2019 I hope to read William Manchester’s 3 volumes of The Last Lion (a biography of Winston Churchill). I’ve already begun the first few pages of volume 1. It’s now just a matter of persevering through hundreds of pages per volume! Also I took off the shelf Samuel Johnson’s 2 volumes on The Lives of the English Poets. Hope my resolution to read these books remains strong throughout the year!

Happy New Year once more!

Author: attycortes

Filipino lawyer, preacher, composer.

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