Speech is Like Salt

Speech is like salt: too little, and we do not taste the flavour of the food; too much, and we are left with the unpleasant taste of the salt. Like salt, our lives and speech are to bring out the ‘flavour’ of Jesus Christ. Too much of ourselves – too much of our talk – will likewise leave an unpleasant taste.

– Sinclair Ferguson, The Sermon on the Mount, p. 60

How Worldliness Begins

A love for the world begins in the soul… It begins with a dull conscience and a listless soul. Sin does not grieve him like it once did. Passion for the Savior begins to cool. Affections grow dim. Excitement lessens for participating in the local church. Eagerness to evangelize starts to wane. Growth in godliness slows to a crawl.

– C. J. Mahaney, Worldliness: Resisting the Seduction of a Fallen World, p. 20

To Belong to No One But God

Standing on rock. Present. The reality of the present and of solitude divorced from past and future. To be collected and gathered up in clarity and silence and to belong to God and to be nobody else’s business…

To belong to God I have to belong to myself. I have to be alone – at least interiorly alone. This means the constant renewal of a decision. I cannot belong to people. None of me belongs to anybody but God. Absolute loneliness of the imagination, the memory, the will…

Now my whole life is this – to keep unencumbered. The wind owns the fields where I walk and I own nothing and am owned by nothing and I shall never even be forgotten because no one will ever discover me.

– Thomas Merton, The Sign of Jonas, p. 253

Spiritual or Secular?

If we believe in God as Creator, we may not divide the world into spiritual and secular. The fact that all reality depends upon the creative word of God means that the word of God must judge the ideas of men about truth and error, not the other way around. Thus the Christian doctrine of the authority of Scripture has its roots in the Creation

– Graeme Goldsworthy, Gospel and Kingdom, (Biblical Classics edition), p. 49

Words of Communion

What are words for? Here’s Eugene Peterson’s take:

The gift of words is for communion… the only words that matter are words of communion. What is distressing is to find out how infrequently they are used… That makes it urgent that the Christian becomes a specialist in words of communion.

– Eugene H. Peterson, Living the Message, meditation for January 9

Spiritual Hermeneutics

But a spiritual taste mightily helps the soul in its reasonings on the word of God, and in judging of the true meaning of its rules; as it removes the prejudices of a depraved appetite, naturally leads the thoughts in the right channel, casts a light on the word, and causes the true meaning most naturally to come to mind, through the harmony there is between the disposition and relish of a sanctified soul, and the true meaning of the rules of God’s word.

— Jonathan Edwards, On Religious Affections